Tags

,

Today’s prompt is a variation on a teaching exercise that the poet Anne Boyer uses with students studying the work of Emily Dickinson. As you may know, although Dickinson is now considered one of the most original and finest poets the United States has produced, she was not recognized in her own time. One reason her poems took a while to gain a favorable reception is their slippery, dash-filled lines. Those dashes baffled her readers so much that the 1924 edition of her complete poems replaced some with commas, and did away with others completely. Today’s exercise asks you to do something similar, but in the interests of creativity, rather than ill-conceived “correction.” Find an Emily Dickinson poem – preferably one you’ve never previously read – and take out all the dashes and line breaks. Make it just one big block of prose. Now, rebreak the lines. Add words where you want. Take out some words. Make your own poem out of it!

The poem I selected for today’s prompt is ‘Hope is the thing with feathers’
My rejigging, which had several phases, resulted in a long, thin, spare version of the original.

Hope
with feathers
perches in my soul
sings the tune
without words
never stops at all.
Hope
in the gale heard:
sore the storm
that could abash
the bird that kept
me warm.
Hope
in chillest lands
on strangest sea
that never
in extremity
asked a crumb
of me.
Hope

Here’s the original, dashes and all –

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

Advertisements